20th September, 2014

npr:

wnyc:

The best and most important blog we discovered this week places octopuses on the heads of United States vice-presidents. All of them.
http://bit.ly/XvhGG6

This is for all of the marine biologists/history buffs out there. -Emily

npr:

wnyc:

The best and most important blog we discovered this week places octopuses on the heads of United States vice-presidents. All of them.

http://bit.ly/XvhGG6

This is for all of the marine biologists/history buffs out there. -Emily

(via NPR)

18th September, 2014

the-hatred-machine:

kareshy:

gigaguess:

mrsdevilla:

the-treble:

internationalgirl:

This is why you should have a cat y’all. Egyptians believed that cats repelled evil spirits.

Cats are evil spirits. They’re just the strongest so all others must bow to their greatness.

Actually according to legend, cats are guardians of the Underworld. So once you are dead if you try to sneak back into the land of the living they send you back where you came from. They protect the living from the dead.

If you ever wonder why a cat stares off into the wild blue yonder and then bolts off for “no reason…”

That cat even looks like it’s accusing him of something like wait a Fucking minute here are you dead did you really think you could slip that shit passed me

I don’t know where you get your sources but cats were not fucking “guardians of the underworld”; this movie is based on EGYPT, cats were common domestic pets by the time Egypt unified, and they were representations of the goddess Bastet, ex goddess of warfare (formerly asociated with a lioness ), post-unification protector goddess. Cats were guardians of houses because they embodied the representation of Bastet, the “EYE of Ra”, the one that tells ra whatever happens. If a cat saw an evil spirit, it would tell Ra, and Ra would smite down the fucker in an instant. Bastet was also feared by evil spirits because she was the only one to be able to harm the evil snake Apep and save Ra’s ass, so you bet someone that escaped Anubis’ judgement and Osiris’ preservation would do well to fear Bastet out of fear of being caught by said gods.They were seen as this as well because they disposed of rats and snakes (perhaps an egyptian once saw a cat killing a snake and went "OH BAST JUST KILLED APEP" and that’s how the mythos started), so they were useful animals to keep as pets, revered, adored, mourned when they died, and if you killed one you received death penalty.
The only animal seen as a “guardian of the underworld” were jackals, because they embodied Anubis and were seen near tombs, but that’s because they entered said tombs to try and eat the corpses and the egyptians based their entire Anubis lore on them.
So yeah, if you were an evil emperor that escaped the process of the gods you once worshipped, unleashed curses around the world disrespecting your own pantheon, and you came across an avatar of the goddess of Warfare that could also call upon Ra to pulverize you with sunlight, and have your soul sundered by Osiris and weighted by Anubis to go to your rightful place as someone who perished AGES ago, you would shit on your pants as well.

the-hatred-machine:

kareshy:

gigaguess:

mrsdevilla:

the-treble:

internationalgirl:

This is why you should have a cat y’all. Egyptians believed that cats repelled evil spirits.

Cats are evil spirits. They’re just the strongest so all others must bow to their greatness.

Actually according to legend, cats are guardians of the Underworld. So once you are dead if you try to sneak back into the land of the living they send you back where you came from. They protect the living from the dead.

If you ever wonder why a cat stares off into the wild blue yonder and then bolts off for “no reason…”

That cat even looks like it’s accusing him of something like wait a Fucking minute here are you dead did you really think you could slip that shit passed me

I don’t know where you get your sources but cats were not fucking “guardians of the underworld”; this movie is based on EGYPT, cats were common domestic pets by the time Egypt unified, and they were representations of the goddess Bastet, ex goddess of warfare (formerly asociated with a lioness ), post-unification protector goddess. Cats were guardians of houses because they embodied the representation of Bastet, the “EYE of Ra”, the one that tells ra whatever happens. If a cat saw an evil spirit, it would tell Ra, and Ra would smite down the fucker in an instant. Bastet was also feared by evil spirits because she was the only one to be able to harm the evil snake Apep and save Ra’s ass, so you bet someone that escaped Anubis’ judgement and Osiris’ preservation would do well to fear Bastet out of fear of being caught by said gods.They were seen as this as well because they disposed of rats and snakes (perhaps an egyptian once saw a cat killing a snake and went "OH BAST JUST KILLED APEP" and that’s how the mythos started), so they were useful animals to keep as pets, revered, adored, mourned when they died, and if you killed one you received death penalty.
The only animal seen as a “guardian of the underworld” were jackals, because they embodied Anubis and were seen near tombs, but that’s because they entered said tombs to try and eat the corpses and the egyptians based their entire Anubis lore on them.
So yeah, if you were an evil emperor that escaped the process of the gods you once worshipped, unleashed curses around the world disrespecting your own pantheon, and you came across an avatar of the goddess of Warfare that could also call upon Ra to pulverize you with sunlight, and have your soul sundered by Osiris and weighted by Anubis to go to your rightful place as someone who perished AGES ago, you would shit on your pants as well.

the-hatred-machine:

kareshy:

gigaguess:

mrsdevilla:

the-treble:

internationalgirl:

This is why you should have a cat y’all. Egyptians believed that cats repelled evil spirits.

Cats are evil spirits. They’re just the strongest so all others must bow to their greatness.

Actually according to legend, cats are guardians of the Underworld. So once you are dead if you try to sneak back into the land of the living they send you back where you came from. They protect the living from the dead.

If you ever wonder why a cat stares off into the wild blue yonder and then bolts off for “no reason…”

That cat even looks like it’s accusing him of something like wait a Fucking minute here are you dead did you really think you could slip that shit passed me

I don’t know where you get your sources but cats were not fucking “guardians of the underworld”; this movie is based on EGYPT, cats were common domestic pets by the time Egypt unified, and they were representations of the goddess Bastet, ex goddess of warfare (formerly asociated with a lioness ), post-unification protector goddess. Cats were guardians of houses because they embodied the representation of Bastet, the “EYE of Ra”, the one that tells ra whatever happens. If a cat saw an evil spirit, it would tell Ra, and Ra would smite down the fucker in an instant. Bastet was also feared by evil spirits because she was the only one to be able to harm the evil snake Apep and save Ra’s ass, so you bet someone that escaped Anubis’ judgement and Osiris’ preservation would do well to fear Bastet out of fear of being caught by said gods.They were seen as this as well because they disposed of rats and snakes (perhaps an egyptian once saw a cat killing a snake and went "OH BAST JUST KILLED APEP" and that’s how the mythos started), so they were useful animals to keep as pets, revered, adored, mourned when they died, and if you killed one you received death penalty.
The only animal seen as a “guardian of the underworld” were jackals, because they embodied Anubis and were seen near tombs, but that’s because they entered said tombs to try and eat the corpses and the egyptians based their entire Anubis lore on them.
So yeah, if you were an evil emperor that escaped the process of the gods you once worshipped, unleashed curses around the world disrespecting your own pantheon, and you came across an avatar of the goddess of Warfare that could also call upon Ra to pulverize you with sunlight, and have your soul sundered by Osiris and weighted by Anubis to go to your rightful place as someone who perished AGES ago, you would shit on your pants as well.

the-hatred-machine:

kareshy:

gigaguess:

mrsdevilla:

the-treble:

internationalgirl:

This is why you should have a cat y’all. Egyptians believed that cats repelled evil spirits.

Cats are evil spirits. They’re just the strongest so all others must bow to their greatness.

Actually according to legend, cats are guardians of the Underworld. So once you are dead if you try to sneak back into the land of the living they send you back where you came from. They protect the living from the dead.

If you ever wonder why a cat stares off into the wild blue yonder and then bolts off for “no reason…”

That cat even looks like it’s accusing him of something like wait a Fucking minute here are you dead did you really think you could slip that shit passed me

I don’t know where you get your sources but cats were not fucking “guardians of the underworld”; this movie is based on EGYPT, cats were common domestic pets by the time Egypt unified, and they were representations of the goddess Bastet, ex goddess of warfare (formerly asociated with a lioness ), post-unification protector goddess. Cats were guardians of houses because they embodied the representation of Bastet, the “EYE of Ra”, the one that tells ra whatever happens. If a cat saw an evil spirit, it would tell Ra, and Ra would smite down the fucker in an instant. Bastet was also feared by evil spirits because she was the only one to be able to harm the evil snake Apep and save Ra’s ass, so you bet someone that escaped Anubis’ judgement and Osiris’ preservation would do well to fear Bastet out of fear of being caught by said gods.They were seen as this as well because they disposed of rats and snakes (perhaps an egyptian once saw a cat killing a snake and went "OH BAST JUST KILLED APEP" and that’s how the mythos started), so they were useful animals to keep as pets, revered, adored, mourned when they died, and if you killed one you received death penalty.
The only animal seen as a “guardian of the underworld” were jackals, because they embodied Anubis and were seen near tombs, but that’s because they entered said tombs to try and eat the corpses and the egyptians based their entire Anubis lore on them.
So yeah, if you were an evil emperor that escaped the process of the gods you once worshipped, unleashed curses around the world disrespecting your own pantheon, and you came across an avatar of the goddess of Warfare that could also call upon Ra to pulverize you with sunlight, and have your soul sundered by Osiris and weighted by Anubis to go to your rightful place as someone who perished AGES ago, you would shit on your pants as well.

the-hatred-machine:

kareshy:

gigaguess:

mrsdevilla:

the-treble:

internationalgirl:

This is why you should have a cat y’all. Egyptians believed that cats repelled evil spirits.

Cats are evil spirits. They’re just the strongest so all others must bow to their greatness.

Actually according to legend, cats are guardians of the Underworld. So once you are dead if you try to sneak back into the land of the living they send you back where you came from. They protect the living from the dead.

If you ever wonder why a cat stares off into the wild blue yonder and then bolts off for “no reason…”

That cat even looks like it’s accusing him of something like wait a Fucking minute here are you dead did you really think you could slip that shit passed me

I don’t know where you get your sources but cats were not fucking “guardians of the underworld”; this movie is based on EGYPT, cats were common domestic pets by the time Egypt unified, and they were representations of the goddess Bastet, ex goddess of warfare (formerly asociated with a lioness ), post-unification protector goddess. Cats were guardians of houses because they embodied the representation of Bastet, the “EYE of Ra”, the one that tells ra whatever happens. If a cat saw an evil spirit, it would tell Ra, and Ra would smite down the fucker in an instant. Bastet was also feared by evil spirits because she was the only one to be able to harm the evil snake Apep and save Ra’s ass, so you bet someone that escaped Anubis’ judgement and Osiris’ preservation would do well to fear Bastet out of fear of being caught by said gods.
They were seen as this as well because they disposed of rats and snakes (perhaps an egyptian once saw a cat killing a snake and went "OH BAST JUST KILLED APEP" and that’s how the mythos started), so they were useful animals to keep as pets, revered, adored, mourned when they died, and if you killed one you received death penalty.

The only animal seen as a “guardian of the underworld” were jackals, because they embodied Anubis and were seen near tombs, but that’s because they entered said tombs to try and eat the corpses and the egyptians based their entire Anubis lore on them.

So yeah, if you were an evil emperor that escaped the process of the gods you once worshipped, unleashed curses around the world disrespecting your own pantheon, and you came across an avatar of the goddess of Warfare that could also call upon Ra to pulverize you with sunlight, and have your soul sundered by Osiris and weighted by Anubis to go to your rightful place as someone who perished AGES ago, you would shit on your pants as well.

image

(Source: rouxx)

(via missART)

16th September, 2014

instagram:


Igniting Handheld Fireworks at Summer Festivals in Japan
For more photos and videos of the handheld fireworks, browse the 手筒花火 hashtag.
Brave men of central Japan ignite handheld fireworks, bringing exciting showers of flames to local summer fire festivals. These cylindrical, handheld pyrotechnics called “tezutsu-hanabi” (手筒花火) originated in Toyohashi during the Edo Period (1603-1868) and continues in modern-day Japan with events such as the 19th annual Fire Festival (炎の祭典) this Saturday. To make these fireworks, craftsmen stuff black powder into bamboo trunks casted with thick ropes. Once lit, the cylinders spray sparks of fire until the explosives finish with a loud blast.
Shinto festivals traditionally used fireworks to protect people from evil spirits and bad fortune, and they now make up an essential summertime activity in Japan. The handheld fireworks are still crafted to present as offerings to local shrines until they are fired on festival day. Only a handful of summer events in central Japan feature this type of fireworks, and the thrilling displays of men inside downpours of sparks offer local and visiting Instagrammers a chance to capture some of the most spectacular moments of the summer.
instagram.com/p/sUlacJS9kw/#turfwindride
instagram:


Igniting Handheld Fireworks at Summer Festivals in Japan
For more photos and videos of the handheld fireworks, browse the 手筒花火 hashtag.
Brave men of central Japan ignite handheld fireworks, bringing exciting showers of flames to local summer fire festivals. These cylindrical, handheld pyrotechnics called “tezutsu-hanabi” (手筒花火) originated in Toyohashi during the Edo Period (1603-1868) and continues in modern-day Japan with events such as the 19th annual Fire Festival (炎の祭典) this Saturday. To make these fireworks, craftsmen stuff black powder into bamboo trunks casted with thick ropes. Once lit, the cylinders spray sparks of fire until the explosives finish with a loud blast.
Shinto festivals traditionally used fireworks to protect people from evil spirits and bad fortune, and they now make up an essential summertime activity in Japan. The handheld fireworks are still crafted to present as offerings to local shrines until they are fired on festival day. Only a handful of summer events in central Japan feature this type of fireworks, and the thrilling displays of men inside downpours of sparks offer local and visiting Instagrammers a chance to capture some of the most spectacular moments of the summer.
instagram.com/p/rPLS5vIqhH/#kitayamaissei
instagram:


Igniting Handheld Fireworks at Summer Festivals in Japan
For more photos and videos of the handheld fireworks, browse the 手筒花火 hashtag.
Brave men of central Japan ignite handheld fireworks, bringing exciting showers of flames to local summer fire festivals. These cylindrical, handheld pyrotechnics called “tezutsu-hanabi” (手筒花火) originated in Toyohashi during the Edo Period (1603-1868) and continues in modern-day Japan with events such as the 19th annual Fire Festival (炎の祭典) this Saturday. To make these fireworks, craftsmen stuff black powder into bamboo trunks casted with thick ropes. Once lit, the cylinders spray sparks of fire until the explosives finish with a loud blast.
Shinto festivals traditionally used fireworks to protect people from evil spirits and bad fortune, and they now make up an essential summertime activity in Japan. The handheld fireworks are still crafted to present as offerings to local shrines until they are fired on festival day. Only a handful of summer events in central Japan feature this type of fireworks, and the thrilling displays of men inside downpours of sparks offer local and visiting Instagrammers a chance to capture some of the most spectacular moments of the summer.
instagram.com/p/rYGE4OCckS/#kohhikida
instagram:


Igniting Handheld Fireworks at Summer Festivals in Japan
For more photos and videos of the handheld fireworks, browse the 手筒花火 hashtag.
Brave men of central Japan ignite handheld fireworks, bringing exciting showers of flames to local summer fire festivals. These cylindrical, handheld pyrotechnics called “tezutsu-hanabi” (手筒花火) originated in Toyohashi during the Edo Period (1603-1868) and continues in modern-day Japan with events such as the 19th annual Fire Festival (炎の祭典) this Saturday. To make these fireworks, craftsmen stuff black powder into bamboo trunks casted with thick ropes. Once lit, the cylinders spray sparks of fire until the explosives finish with a loud blast.
Shinto festivals traditionally used fireworks to protect people from evil spirits and bad fortune, and they now make up an essential summertime activity in Japan. The handheld fireworks are still crafted to present as offerings to local shrines until they are fired on festival day. Only a handful of summer events in central Japan feature this type of fireworks, and the thrilling displays of men inside downpours of sparks offer local and visiting Instagrammers a chance to capture some of the most spectacular moments of the summer.
instagram.com/p/s4WECEDBo4/#alf_rus
instagram:


Igniting Handheld Fireworks at Summer Festivals in Japan
For more photos and videos of the handheld fireworks, browse the 手筒花火 hashtag.
Brave men of central Japan ignite handheld fireworks, bringing exciting showers of flames to local summer fire festivals. These cylindrical, handheld pyrotechnics called “tezutsu-hanabi” (手筒花火) originated in Toyohashi during the Edo Period (1603-1868) and continues in modern-day Japan with events such as the 19th annual Fire Festival (炎の祭典) this Saturday. To make these fireworks, craftsmen stuff black powder into bamboo trunks casted with thick ropes. Once lit, the cylinders spray sparks of fire until the explosives finish with a loud blast.
Shinto festivals traditionally used fireworks to protect people from evil spirits and bad fortune, and they now make up an essential summertime activity in Japan. The handheld fireworks are still crafted to present as offerings to local shrines until they are fired on festival day. Only a handful of summer events in central Japan feature this type of fireworks, and the thrilling displays of men inside downpours of sparks offer local and visiting Instagrammers a chance to capture some of the most spectacular moments of the summer.
instagram.com/p/sBSlOVC7WP/#ne_taso
instagram:


Igniting Handheld Fireworks at Summer Festivals in Japan
For more photos and videos of the handheld fireworks, browse the 手筒花火 hashtag.
Brave men of central Japan ignite handheld fireworks, bringing exciting showers of flames to local summer fire festivals. These cylindrical, handheld pyrotechnics called “tezutsu-hanabi” (手筒花火) originated in Toyohashi during the Edo Period (1603-1868) and continues in modern-day Japan with events such as the 19th annual Fire Festival (炎の祭典) this Saturday. To make these fireworks, craftsmen stuff black powder into bamboo trunks casted with thick ropes. Once lit, the cylinders spray sparks of fire until the explosives finish with a loud blast.
Shinto festivals traditionally used fireworks to protect people from evil spirits and bad fortune, and they now make up an essential summertime activity in Japan. The handheld fireworks are still crafted to present as offerings to local shrines until they are fired on festival day. Only a handful of summer events in central Japan feature this type of fireworks, and the thrilling displays of men inside downpours of sparks offer local and visiting Instagrammers a chance to capture some of the most spectacular moments of the summer.
instagram.com/p/rzCnVYKawC/#tommyritoriki
instagram:


Igniting Handheld Fireworks at Summer Festivals in Japan
For more photos and videos of the handheld fireworks, browse the 手筒花火 hashtag.
Brave men of central Japan ignite handheld fireworks, bringing exciting showers of flames to local summer fire festivals. These cylindrical, handheld pyrotechnics called “tezutsu-hanabi” (手筒花火) originated in Toyohashi during the Edo Period (1603-1868) and continues in modern-day Japan with events such as the 19th annual Fire Festival (炎の祭典) this Saturday. To make these fireworks, craftsmen stuff black powder into bamboo trunks casted with thick ropes. Once lit, the cylinders spray sparks of fire until the explosives finish with a loud blast.
Shinto festivals traditionally used fireworks to protect people from evil spirits and bad fortune, and they now make up an essential summertime activity in Japan. The handheld fireworks are still crafted to present as offerings to local shrines until they are fired on festival day. Only a handful of summer events in central Japan feature this type of fireworks, and the thrilling displays of men inside downpours of sparks offer local and visiting Instagrammers a chance to capture some of the most spectacular moments of the summer.
instagram.com/p/sm6jwWPT8Z/#naruohta0412

instagram:

Igniting Handheld Fireworks at Summer Festivals in Japan

For more photos and videos of the handheld fireworks, browse the 手筒花火 hashtag.

Brave men of central Japan ignite handheld fireworks, bringing exciting showers of flames to local summer fire festivals. These cylindrical, handheld pyrotechnics called “tezutsu-hanabi” (手筒花火) originated in Toyohashi during the Edo Period (1603-1868) and continues in modern-day Japan with events such as the 19th annual Fire Festival (炎の祭典) this Saturday. To make these fireworks, craftsmen stuff black powder into bamboo trunks casted with thick ropes. Once lit, the cylinders spray sparks of fire until the explosives finish with a loud blast.

Shinto festivals traditionally used fireworks to protect people from evil spirits and bad fortune, and they now make up an essential summertime activity in Japan. The handheld fireworks are still crafted to present as offerings to local shrines until they are fired on festival day. Only a handful of summer events in central Japan feature this type of fireworks, and the thrilling displays of men inside downpours of sparks offer local and visiting Instagrammers a chance to capture some of the most spectacular moments of the summer.

(via NPR)